GSN Alert: September 20th – National Rum Punch Day

A_Midnight_Modern_ConversationBack in my college days, I thought that punch equalled a 1.5l bottle of Silver Bacardi mixed together with a few cans of tropical flavored Hawaiian Punch.  After a few different occasions where this was the beverage of choice, I had enough to last me a lifetime and moved on to other less cloying things like IPA.  In fact, I hadn’t had any punch for a few decades until I read David Wondrich’s phenomenal book Imbibe! back in 2007.  I decided to make a batch of Philadelphia Fish House Punch for my first effort, and there’s been no turning back for me.  Granted, there is a bit of extra work involved than just emptying bottles into a large bowl (oleo-saccharum, anyone?), but it pays off in spades.  Not only is a real punch incredibly tasty, but you realize why punches are gaining popularity again.  These days, many of the best bars offer punch bowls on the menu, and some are even served with antique cups.

Here’s the recipe for PFHP (luckily, it doesn’t actually call for any fish).

Philadelphia Fish House Punch
(Servings: 18 – 20)
1 cup sugar
4 lemons, peeled and peels reserved
4 cups black tea (or water)
1 cup lemon juice
4 cups rum, Jamaican
2 cups cognac
1/2 cup peach brandy
Garnish: lemon wheels and freshly grated nutmeg

In a large bowl, add sugar and lemon peels, and rub together to release the citrus oils into the sugar. (This is called oleo-saccharum).
Allow oleo-saccharum to infuse for at least 30 minutes.
Dissolve sugar with warm water or tea.
Add rum, cognac, lemon juice and peach brandy and stir to mix.
Add a block of ice to chill, and continue to add smaller pieces of ice for desired dilution.
Garnish with lemon wheels and freshly grated nutmeg.
Ladle into individual glasses.

Another quite popular punch is Planter’s Punch, the recipe for which was first published as a poem in the New York Times on August 8, 1908.

Planter’s Punch
This recipe I give to thee,
Dear brother in the heat.
Take two of sour (lime let it be)
To one and a half of sweet,
Of Old Jamaica pour three strong,
And add four parts of weak.
Then mix and drink. I do no wrong —
I know whereof I speak.

Pretty easy to figure out what the measurements are, if you’re handy with a jigger.

Cheers!

GSN Review: Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin Sardinian Citrus

Palm Bay International recently announced the arrival of Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin Sardinian Citrus, the newest addition to its growing artisanal spirits portfolio. This latest creation from the Shed Distillery in Ireland, was originally intended to be a limited edition release but has been so well received by consumers that it has now been added to the distillery’s main offerings. Its key ingredient, Citrus monstruosa, is one of the rarest citrus fruits in the entire world and pairs with the existing citric notes of fresh lemons, limes, and grapefruit in Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin.

GSN’s Remarks: A lovely nose with a fruity and dry citrus character. The entry is bright and crisp, with a welcome brace of juniper. The character of the tea comes through and is enhanced by the Sardinian Citrus, making it a complex and curious gin. It’s easy to see why this latest iteration became popular. Eminently mixable and flavorful beyind the typical evergreen-like notes, this makes for some great cocktails, whether vintage or post-modern. A real winner. GSN Rating: A

For more information go to: Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin

GSN Spirited News: September 14th 2021 Edition

Kentucky’s Covered Bridge Whiskey Company has expanded its offerings, adding a new rye whiskey to its Ruddell’s Mill label. The 47.2% abv whiskey is distilled from a high-rye mash bill that also includes malted barley. The brand is named for the founder of a gristmill that operated in Bourbon country during the early years of Kentucky whiskey production. Ruddell’s Mill rye is now available in select markets across the U.S. through Worldwide Libations for around $50 a 750-ml.

E.& J. Gallo has launched a new 19-year-old expression in the Germain-Robin family of brandies. The 41.4% abv single barrel brandy is distilled from Pinot Noir grapes from the Anderson Valley in Mendocino county and matured in Limousin oak barrels. Germain-Robin Pinot Noir Single Barrel is now available at the company’s California Brandy House in Napa for $250. It will soon be available in other select locations across the U.S.

Rothes, Scotland’s the Glen Grant Distillery is celebrating the 60th anniversary of distiller Dennis Malcolm with a new 60-year-old single malt whisky. The Dennis Malcolm 60th Anniversary Edition is bottled at 52.8% abv and is drawn from a single ex-Oloroso Sherry cask filled in October, 1960. Only 360 Glencairn decanters are available in select global retailers with each bottle selling for €25,000 (roughly $30,000).

Peoria, Illinois-based JK Williams Distilling is adding two new products to its lineup. Distilled six times, Blueprint Vodka (40% abv) is the first clear spirit from the company, featuring the Peoria skyline and a local bridge on the bottle. The distillery is also launching its new Bridge Series with American Wheat Whiskey, made from 95% wheat and bottled at 47% abv. It will retail for $50 a bottle at select Illinois retailers as the third release from JK Williams since it launched its initial offerings in the fall of 2020. Named for a storied bootlegger, JK Williams’ previously released Gold Zephyr Straight Bourbon Whiskey and Stormy River High Rye Whiskey.

Actress Eva Longoria has introduced a new luxury Tequila brand, Casa del SolThe new franchise includes 100% Blue Weber agave Blanco ($60 a 750-ml.), Reposado ($70) and Añejo ($100) expressions, the latter two of which are aged in Martell Cognac barrels. Alejandra Pelayo, Casa Del Sol’s head of production, is a protege and goddaughter of the late Patrón master distiller Francisco Alcaraz. Casa del Sol is launching now in California, Colorado, and Florida ahead of a national rollout slated for early next year.

Lux Row Distillers is releasing a new Bourbon in partnership with conservation organization Ducks Unlimited. The new release is called Daviess County Double Barrel Bourbon and is a variation on Lux Row’s existing Daviess County Bourbon. Created by Lux Row master distiller and Ducks Unlimited member John Rempe, it’s finished in Missouri white oak barrels with toasted heads and bottled at 48% abv. The label features an inset of the Ducks Unlimited duck head logo. The Double Barrel Bourbon is available in mid-September, with limited supplies retailing for a suggested $50 a 750-ml. 

YaVe Tequila has extended its range with a Reposado expression. Aged eight months in American oak barrels, the brand’s new Reposado is bottled at 40% abv and retails at $60 a 750-ml. It joins the existing Blanco Tequila in the YaVe range, which is distributed across eight markets (and ships to 33 states nationwide).

Compass Box has introduced a new blended malt Scotch whisky called Orchard House. Compass Box says the majority of the recipe is made from stocks of spirit purchased from distilleries known for their fruit-forward flavor. These spirits were then aged in a variety of casks including first fill ex-Bourbon barrels, Oloroso Sherry-seasoned butts, and French oak custom barrels. Retailing at $50 a 750-ml. and bottled at 46% abv, Compass Box Orchard House will be part of the brand’s core collection and will debut widely in October.

Beam Suntory has released 100 bottles of the Yamazaki 55 Japanese whisky in select global markets. The 46% abv offering is a blend of whiskies distilled in 1960 and 1964, with the older whisky maturing in Mizunara oak and the younger whisky in white oak, before bottling in 2020. The whisky is available in the U.S., U.K., mainland China, and Taiwan, among other nations, for a suggested price of $60,000 a bottle. For each bottle released, Beam Suntory will donate $5,000 to the White Oak Initiative, a group focused on sustaining America’s white oak forests.

Information courtesy of Shanken News Daily

GSN Brews News: September 14th 2021 Edition

The Boston Beer Company is launching Bevy Long Drink, inspired by the national cocktail of Finland. Invented for guests at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, a traditional Long Drink consists of gin, grapefruit soda, and tonic. Boston Beer’s canned version will launch with two flavors: Sparkling Citrus Refresher and Sparkling Berry Refresher, both at 5.8% abv and made with a malt base containing juniper berries instead of spirits. Bevy Long Drink will launch in November in 6- and 12-packs of 12-ounce cans as well as single 24-ounce cans.

Information courtesy of Shanken News Daily

GSN Alert: September 15th – National Crème de Menthe Day

Qtimthumb.phpuick!  How many classic crème de menthe based cocktails can you name? Go!

That’s what I thought.  Highlight the area to the right to see if you got them all -> Grasshopper, Stinger

Crème de menthe is one of those liqueurs that once you try, you will never forget.  For obvious reasons it is used in a fair amount of obscure Irish cocktails, but personally I avoid those.

Crème de menthe is not a cream based liqueur, but rather a category of spirits known as crèmes, which are more syrupy and sugar laden than standard liquors.  It is made from Corsican mint or peppermint and is either colorless (white) or vibrantly green.  Most products today use food coloring to achieve the effect.  The flavors are exactly the same however.

If you want to try making your own at home, here’s a recipe courtesy of Marcia Simmons, co-author of DIY Cocktails which I have previously reviewed here.

DIY Creme de Menthe
1 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves (divided)
1 1/2 cups vodka
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup water

  • Measure out 1 cup of mint leaves and tear them in quarters Place mint leaves in a sealable glass jar and pour vodka on top. Shake and let steep for 12 hours.
  • After steeping is complete, strain mint leaves from infused vodka. Return infused vodka to the jar.
  • Bring the water and sugar to a boil, and let simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool, then add syrup to mint-infused vodka.
  • Take the additional 1/2 cup of mint leaves, tear them, and add them to the jar. Shake and let steep for 10 hours.
  • Strain twice to remove all mint leaves, keep in resealable bottle. Keeps for two months.

GSN Review: Pastis Henri Bardouin

There are the pastis brands that everyone knows, and then there is Pastis Henri Bardouin. Another vision of what pastis should be; Pastis Henri Bardouin takes us on a journey into the heart of history from around the world. More than 65 ingredients are used in crafting this liquor, including anise mixed with angelica, sagebrush, and star anise; cinnamon mixed with cardamom, cornflower and tonka bean; cloves mixed with grains of paradise, peppers and balm; liquorice mixed with nutmeg, rosemary, sage, thyme and many others that are all a closely guarded secret.

Distillerie de Lure, founded in 1898 at Forcalquier, in Provence, has had a succession of owners for nearly 80 years, amongst whom was Henri Bardouin, a man with a passionate interest in plants and herbs. In 1974 Alain Robert and his team took the helm of the company now known as Distilleries et Domaines de Provence.

GSN’s Remarks: Pastis is the less bitter and more herbal cousin to absinthe. Generally used as an aperitif to stimulate the appetite before a meal, it can also be used during the meal and even as a digestif. This particular pastis serves all three purposes beautifully. We like the soft herbality and warm sweetness of the liqueur. Considering that there are over five dozen ingredients, the end result is clean and refreshing. We enjoy a 5-1 ratio of pastis with cool water. GSN Rating: A+

For more information go to: Crillon Importers Ltd

#PastisHenriBardouin

GSN Review: Absente

Launched in 1998, Absente was the first legal absinthe liqueur containing thujone. Absinthe, nicknamed the “green fairy” and banned in 1915, was authorized for production again in 1988. But it was only in 2011 that the level of thujone (a molecule present in the plant which, in strong dose, was incorrectly identified as the chemical that drove people mad) is now fixed at a maximum of 35 mg/kg. Absente only contains 10 mg/kg of thujone.

Absinthe is made by macerating various herbs and plants (grand wormwood, petite wormwood, green anise, fennel, amongst others) in a mixture of alcohol and water, followed by distillation. Absente is brought down to 110 proof before bottling.

As for how to enjoy Absente? The famous tasting ritual is still practiced according to the tradition, by pouring chilled water into the absinthe, through a perforated spoon supporting a single cube of sugar. Please do not light anything on fire. This is dangerous and ruins the overall flavor of the drink.

GSN’s Remarks: A well made and tasty absinthe. The flavor is authentic and has a slightly bitter edge, but overall is very much sweet anise, fennel and licorice.  Perfect in a frappe, this also works wonders in a Sazerac. GSN Rating: A

For more information go to: Crillon Importers Limited

#Absente

GSN Review: The Botanist Islay Dry Gin

Founded in 2011, The Botanist Islay Dry Gin is distilled and hand-crafted at Bruichladdich Distillery on Islay, a remote island off the west coast of Scotland. It is the first and only Islay Dry Gin – a rare expression of the heart and soul of this wild Scottish isle. Hailing from one of the only B Corp certified distilleries in the world, The Botanist believes in using business as a force for good, putting people and planet in line with profit.

The liquid is distilled with a unique combination of 22 wild Islay botanicals which are hand-foraged locally and sustainably on the island by The Botanist’s professional forager, James Donaldson. The Islay botanicals are slow simmer distilled with Islay spring water in a unique Lomond Still, affectionately nicknamed Ugly Betty, by Head Distiller Adam Hannett. The result is a gin that speaks of the locality and seasonality of Islay.

GSN’s Remarks: A well balanced, round and crisp gin crafted with nearly two dozen interesting ingredients. We like the flavor profile which has a softer juniper character, but also a swish of citrus overlaying the more herbal characteristics. A rare gin that needs nothing else. However, we do recommend it in Martinis, citrus forward cocktails, and even the humble G&T. GSN Rating: A

For more information go to: The Botanist

#thebotanist

 

GSN Brews News: September 7th 2021 Edition

Corvallis, Oregon-based 2 Towns Ciderhouse is launching an array of ciders in 19-ounce cans. The first to market in the new format is Strawberade, a 6.5% abv pink lemonade cider made with California Meyer lemons along with strawberries and apples from the Pacific Northwest. Strawberade is joined in 19-ounce cans by OutCider, 2 Towns’ unfiltered release made with Jonagold apples and at 5% abv. The new packaging options will be available throughout the cidery’s west coast distribution area that also includes Minnesota.

Austin, Texas-based Canteen Spirits has launched a new line of gin-based canned cocktails. Canteen’s Gin Spritzes come in three flavors—Blossom Gin Spritz with hibiscus and lime, Citrus Gin Spritz with lemon and cucumber, and Ruby Gin Spritz with grapefruit and rosemary—all at 5% abv and available in variety 6-packs of 12-ounce cans and as individual cans.

Vermont-based Lawson’s Finest Liquids has released Kiwi Double IPA in its 9-state distribution footprint. The 8.1% abv ale is brewed with Nelson Sauvin and Pacific Jade hops and was previously a taproom exclusive offering. The beer is part of Lawson’s specialty release series and will be available in September and October. Lawson’s beers are sold in Vermont, Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

Baltimore, Maryland-based DuClaw Brewing Company is releasing Lemonade Stand by Me, a hopped sour made with raspberries and Meyer lemon puree. The label features a lemonade stand design and a QR code that can be scanned to access a music playlist to accompany the beverage. It’s at 7.1% abv and is available now in 12-ounce cans and on draft at select locations across DuClaw’s 22-state distribution area. 

Information courtesy of Shanken News Daily

GSN Spirited News: September 7th 2021 Edition

Versailles, Kentucky-based Woodford Reserve is partnering with home retailer Williams Sonoma on a program of cocktail mixers and consumer experiences. Available now, the line of cocktail mixers features drinks including the Old Fashioned, Whiskey Sour, and Mint Julep. They can be purchased at Woodford Reserve locations and on the Williams Sonoma website for $19 a 16-ounce bottle. Additionally, the partnership includes multiple online cocktail classes led by Woodford assistant master distiller Elizabeth McCall, with additional products and experiences to be announced in the coming months and years.

Proximo Spirits’ Maestro Dobel Tequila has launched Pavito, a new Pechuga Tequila. The 40% abv Tequila is made by infusing the distilling spirit with fruits, spices, and turkey, a process more commonly used in mezcal production. According to the company, the infusion brings a rich, savory quality to the spirit, while still allowing the agave to shine through. Maestro Dobel Pavito is now available in select retailers across the U.S. for a suggested price of $60 a 750-ml.

Colorado-based Laws Whiskey House has released the second batch of its Bonded Henry Road Straight Malt WhiskeyThe 50% abv whiskey is distilled entirely from heirloom barley sourced locally, with the mash cooked, fermented, and distilled on-grain, which the distiller says imparts a unique nuttiness to the whiskey. This release consists of eight barrels of whiskey matured for five years, yielding nearly 2,400 750-ml. bottles. Laws Bonded Henry Road Straight Malt Whiskey is now available in select markets across the U.S. at a suggested price of $75 a bottle.

Information courtesy of Shanken News Daily

GSN Review: Disaronno Velvet White Russian

Disaronno and Russian Standard recently announced a new partnership culminating in a cocktail, the Velvet White Russian. The Velvet White Russian is a unique twist on the popular “Big Lebowski” drink, combining 1 part Disaronno Velvet, 1 part Russian Standard Original Vodka and 2 parts cream, served in a rocks glass over ice.

Launched in April 2020, Disaronno Velvet is the newest innovation to the liqueur category from the iconic Disaronno brand. Bottled at 17% ABV, Disaronno Velvet combines the flavor of almonds with nuances of chocolate and vanilla, all while providing the quintessential Amaretto flavor profile of Disaronno.

Russian Standard Original Vodka is crafted using hardy winter wheat and water drawn from Lake Ladoga, one of the largest lakes in the world and a source of naturally soft water. It is distilled over 200 times and filtered through charcoal resulting in a vodka that offers both purity and taste. Russian Standard pays incredible attention to detail, even rinsing their caps and bottles with vodka to maintain the integrity of its liquid.

GSN’s Remarks: The Velvet Cream Liqueur is quite good, if a tad sweet, but when mixed with the additon of vodka and cream, it tempers down to a soft sweetness. Really, the overall flavor of this cocktail is of a candy bar. We applaud the collaboration with Russian Standard, which is one of our “go-to’s” when looking for a vodka. This is a fine, if simple drink, perfect for the fall-like weather that is heading our way. GSN Rating: B+

For more information go to: Disaronno & Vodka

#Disarronno #RussianStandard

GSN Alert: September 7th – National Beer Lover’s Day

Beer and the process of brewing beer may predate known history.  As varied as the methods, grains, and flavors, beer continues to change and evolve over time.
Virginia colonists brewed beer. William Penn included a place for brewing beer within the colony of Pennsylvania which can still be visited at Pennsbury Manor today. The first President of the United States recorded a recipe for brewing beer in his notes. Samuel Adams holds a place in both beer and tea history in this country.  There were a few beer lovers and patriots among the nation’s founders.
The United States also derives its rich brewing history from beer-loving German immigrants during the mid-1800s. Some of those immigrants families’ names are as familiar today as they were a hundred years ago.
While some names have faded into the past, smaller batch brewers continue to experiment with old and new recipes.  The crafting of beer carries rich traditions, often requiring years of training and experience in the trade. Depending on the brewery, the path to brewmaster may take years to develop the skill and expertise necessary to produce a quality beer every time.  One certain requirement is a love of beer and the craft. Toast to this iconic beverage on September 7th with a pint of your favorite!

GSN Alert: Cocktail & Spirits Book Preview – Autumn 2021

Nearly two dozen new books are coming out this autumn. Everything from making your own booze, to the history of bourbon, to zero waste cocktails to an encyclopedia of spirits. Enjoy!

Craft Gin Making by Rachel Hicks and Andrew Parsons The Crowood Press (September 1, 2021) Craft Gin Making is a detailed guide to entering the world of gin production. For beginners and experienced producers alike, it offers key insights and practical advice on what you need to get started and how to progress in this fascinating and growing craft. It covers both distilling and cold compounding, providing advice on equipment and detailing step-by-step processes, whilst discussing a wide variety of gin production issues. Topics covered include a brief history of gin and gin making; the tools, equipment and ingredients needed for the different methods of producing gin; the most common methods and how to achieve success in them; the practicalities of filtration, bottling, sealing and labelling; making flavored gins; why things might go wrong and how to correct them and, finally, the legal aspects of gin production.

Buffalo, Barrels, & Bourbon: The Story of How Buffalo Trace Distillery Became The World’s Most Awarded Distillery by F. Paul Pacult Wiley; 1st edition (September 8, 2021) Buffalo, Barrels, & Bourbon tells the fascinating tale of the Buffalo Trace Distillery, from the time of the earliest explorations of Kentucky to the present day. Author and award-winning spirits expert F. Paul Pacult takes readers on a journey through history that covers the American Revolutionary War, U.S Civil War, two World Wars, Prohibition, and the Great Depression. Buffalo, Barrels, & Bourbon covers the pedigree and provenance of the Buffalo Trace Distillery: The larger-than-life personalities that over a century and a half made Buffalo Trace Distillery what it is today; Detailed accounts on how many of the distillery’s award-winning and world-famous brands were created; The impact of world events, including multiple depressions, weather-related events, and major conflicts, on the distillery. Belonging on the shelf of anyone with an interest in American spirits and history, Buffalo, Barrels, & Bourbon is a compelling must-read.

The Café Brûlot by Sue Strachan LSU Press (September 15, 2021) The Café Brûlot examines the cocktail that was born of a legend and has endured through the centuries, showcasing New Orleans’s love of flavored drama. A combination of coffee, liquor, and fire, Café Brûlot also goes by the name Café Brûlot Diabolique, “devilishly incendiary coffee.” Varying somewhat depending on what restaurant makes it, the base ingredients of this unusual after-dinner drink are coffee, brandy, sugar, cinnamon, lemon, oranges, cloves, and sometimes an orange liqueur. Although the drink may have originated in France, Café Brûlot is primarily mixed in New Orleans, making it a unique Crescent City tradition. In this entertaining little book, Sue Strachan delves into the history of the cocktail, the story of its various ingredients, and the customary implements used to serve it.

A Good Drink: In Pursuit of Sustainable Spirits by Shanna Farrell Island Press (September 16, 2021) In A Good Drink, Farrell goes in search of the bars, distillers, and farmers who are driving a transformation to sustainable spirits. She meets mezcaleros in Guadalajara who are working to preserve traditional ways of producing mezcal, for the health of the local land, the wallets of the local farmers, and the culture of the community. She visits distillers in South Carolina who are bringing a rare variety of corn back from near extinction to make one of the most sought-after bourbons in the world. She meets a London bar owner who has eliminated individual bottles and ice, acculturating drinkers to a new definition of luxury. These individuals are part of a growing trend to recognize spirits for what they are—part of our food system. For readers who have ever wondered who grew the pears that went into their brandy or why their cocktail is an unnatural shade of red, A Good Drink will be an eye-opening tour of the spirits industry. For anyone who cares about the future of the planet, it offers a hopeful vision of change, one pour at a time.

Virginia Distilled: Four Centuries of Drinking in the Old Dominion by Patrick Evans-Hylton The History Press (October 4, 2021) Colonist George Thorpe first crafted “corn beere,” an ancestor to bourbon, in 1620 at Berkeley Plantation, and George Washington once operated one of the nation’s largest distilleries. Icy mint juleps were first served in Virginia until the state was one of the first to enact Prohibition. That dark period gave rise to bootlegging, moonshining and even NASCAR. Through well-documented research, interviews with key stakeholders and plenty of cocktail recipes for the reader to shake and stir at home, author Patrick Evans-Hylton showcases the rich history of four hundred years of drinking in the Commonwealth. Raise a glass to Virginia, birthplace of American spirits, and its long history of distilling and imbibing.

Rare Whisky: Explore the World’s Most Exquisite Spirits by Patrick Mahé Conran (October 5, 2021) Rare Whisky is a stylish exploration of the world’s finest and rarest whiskies, exquisitely packaged in a hardback book with slipcase. This book looks at the most exceptional whiskies across the world, focusing on key producers such as Scotland, Ireland, the USA and Japan, as well as interesting rarities from the likes of India and Taiwan. With beautiful photography of extremely rare bottles, from a breathtaking 1920s vintage sold at auction to the best offerings from recent years, Rare Whisky is essential reading for all whisky lovers.

The Cocktail Workshop: An Essential Guide to Classic Drinks and How to Make Them Your Own by Steven Grasse & Adam Erace Running Press Adult (October 5, 2021) From the wildly creative team behind Philadelphia’s Art in the Age comes The Cocktail Workshop, a deep-dive into 20 classic drinks that make up the foundation of cocktail creation, and the delicious variations that will make them all your own. Learn to craft a perfect, classic drink, or workshop that creation into a unique, flavor-forward spin with The Cocktail Workshop, an indispensable guide to foundational cocktails and the tools to elevate them into master-level creations. In this richly illustrated book, the team behind Philadelphia’s beloved Art in the Age guides aspiring mixologists through the fundamentals of 20 essential cocktails. Then, each foundational drink is spun off into creative and customizable riffs on flavors, techniques, and ingredients, called Apprentice, Journeyman, and Master versions. Each classic drink is concluded by a Workshop: how to take your at-home bar efforts to the next level with aging, infusing, garnishing, and more.

The Atlas of Bourbon and American Whiskey: A Journey Through the Spirit of America by Eric Zandona Mitchell Beazley (October 5, 2021) A stylish region-by-region​ guide to American whiskey, by the author of The Bourbon Bible. Eric Zandona – spirits expert at the American Distilling Institute – leads a region-by-region tour of the unique flavors and stories of American whiskey, from Kentucky’s bourbon heartland to New York’s Empire Rye revolution. With chapters telling the story of each key whiskey-producing region, plus profiles of notable distilleries and a flavor guide for their most interesting whiskeys, you’ll learn all there is to know about the only true American spirit.

The Big Book of Bourbon Cocktails: 100 Timeless, Creative & Tempting Recipes by Amy Zavatto Rockridge Press (October 5, 2021) If you’re a bourbon aficionado―or an aspiring one―you hold in your hands the essential guide to plenty of inventive and exciting ways to savor an American classic. From a traditional Old Fashioned to a Churchill Downs Crusta, explore 100 cocktails that incorporate flavors from a variety of bourbons, regions, and time periods. From a solo nightcap, to pre-dinner drinks for two and cocktails for a crowd, you’ll learn to whip up the perfect bourbon drink for every occasion. Taste trendy new flavors created exclusively for this book, and long-forgotten recipes from the Prohibition era.

The New Craft Beer World: Celebrating over 400 delicious beers by Mark Dredge Dog n Bone; Second edition (October 12, 2021) With more amazing beers available than ever before, it’s hard to know which ones to choose. That’s where The New Craft Beer World comes in. Gathering together over 400 of the most innovative and tastiest beers you need to try, and divided into 50 different categories, you will find the best of the best each style has to offer. Every category comes with an explanation of the key characteristics of the style—whether it’s an American IPA bursting with citrusy C-hops or an Imperial Stout full of dark roasted malts—along with an example of a classic brew and a selection of cutting edge versions that are certain to become instant favorites. So whether you’re looking for bitter beers or balanced flavors, a hit of hops or a hint of coffee, the reviews will point you in the right direction to find the perfect beer to suit your tastebuds. Also included are interesting nuggets of beer information, covering everything from the catalyst that has caused the astonishing growth in craft beer through to matching beer with food and how to serve your drinks.

From Garden to Glass: 80 Botanical Beverages Made from the Finest Fruits, Cordials, and Infusions by David Hurst Rizzoli Universe Promotional Books (October 12, 2021) For the legions of readers who enjoyed The Drunken Botanist: The Plants that Create the World’s Best Drinks, here is a new health and nutrition conscious take on making infusions, cordials, and cocktails mixers with garden fresh herbs, fruits, and spices. From Garden to Glass is a unique collection of over 70 delicious botanically inspired recipes based on what is available fresh from the garden or farm stand. These “garden to glass” recipes are for non-alcoholic infusions and cordials based on fresh fruits, garden herbs, and spices which can be consumed as restorative tonics in their own right or can be used as the basis for mouthwatering cocktails – cocktails filled with garden fresh nutrients and antioxidants, making them far healthier than ordinary bar drinks. Organized according to main ingredient, the recipes are created with an eye toward both health and taste. All recipes include fresh from the garden botanicals such as elderberries, strawberries, tomato, mints, and other herbs. Thus, an ordinary Bloody Mary is transformed into a healthy power drink by using freshly crushed garden tomatoes, chilies, and other spices. Many recipes also use “superfood” ingredients, from açai berry and avocado to papaya and pomegranate. Each creation is expertly crafted and inspired by some of the most exciting trends in bartending and mixology. The book also explains how to make professional-quality mixed drinks in your home, listing essential bar kit, fancy glassware, party planning, and finishing touches that can transform an ordinary drink into an exceptional cocktail.

Fever-Tree Easy Mixing: More than 150 quick and delicious mixed drinks and cocktails by Fever-Tree Limited Mitchell Beazley (October 12, 2021) 150 cocktails and mixed drinks that you can make at home in no more than 3 minutes. This means simple ingredients, not too many of them, and things you will have in your cupboard and fridge without having to trawl the internet or specialty drinks aisles. In a further twist, many recipes offer three variations – simple, sassy and sophisticated -so you can choose whether to go for the speediest when you are short of time, or the souped-up version when you are in the mood to experiment. Chapters such as Mojitos and Mules offer brilliant spins on familiar classics, No-Low has lots of ideas for alcohol-free drinks and Pitcher Perfect is packed with easy recipes that you can batch and make in quantity to serve to a crowd. All the simple, speedy and delicious ideas you would expect from the world’s leading premium mixer brand.

The Way of the Cocktail: Japanese Traditions, Techniques, and Recipes by Julia Momosé & Emma Janzen Clarkson Potter; Illustrated edition (October 12, 2021) With its studious devotion to tradition, craftsmanship, and hospitality, Japanese cocktail culture is an art form treated with reverence. In this essential guide, Japanese American bartender Julia Momosé of Kumiko and Kikkō in Chicago takes us on a journey into this realm. She educates and inspires while breaking down master techniques and delving into the soul of the culture: the traditions and philosophy, the tools and the spirits—and the complex layering of these elements that makes this approach so significant. The recipes are inspired by the twenty-four micro-seasons that define the flow of life in Japan. Enter a world where the spiced woodsy cocktail called Autumn’s Jacket evokes the smoldering burn of smoking rice fields in fall, and where the Delicate Refusal tells the tale of spring’s tragic beauty, with tequila blanco and a flutter of sakura petals. Perfected classics like the Manhattan and Negroni, riffs on some of Japan’s most beloved cocktails like the Whisky Highball, and even alcohol-free drinks influenced by ingredients such as yuzu, matcha, and umé round out the collection.

Girly Drinks: A World History of Women and Alcohol by Mallory O’Meara Hanover Square Press; Original edition (October 19, 2021) Strawberry daiquiris. Skinny martinis. Vodka sodas with lime. These are the cocktails that come in sleek-stemmed glasses, bright colors and fruity flavors—these are the Girly Drinks. From the earliest days of civilization, alcohol has been at the center of social rituals and cultures worldwide. But when exactly did drinking become a gendered act? And why have bars long been considered “places for men” when, without women, they might not even exist? With whip-smart insight and boundless curiosity, Girly Drinks unveils an entire untold history of the female distillers, drinkers and brewers who have played a vital role in the creation and consumption of alcohol, from ancient Sumerian beer goddess Ninkasi to iconic 1920s bartender Ada Coleman. Filling a crucial gap in culinary history, O’Meara dismantles the long-standing patriarchal traditions at the heart of these very drinking cultures, in the hope that readers everywhere can look to each celebrated woman in this book—and proudly have what she’s having.

Anthologin by Samuele Ambrosi & Maurizio Maestrelli Guido Tommasi Editore (October 27, 2021) Anthologin is the product of a fortuitous encounter that brought together Samuele Ambrosi, an internationally renowned, multi-award-winning barman with a stellar résumé, Maurizio Maestrelli, esteemed journalist and author of several books on beer and spirits, and Serena Conti, fine illustrator and designer whose collaborations have extended far beyond Italy’s borders. It tells the fascinating story of gin, that most popular of spirits whose long, seductive history transcends aromas and flavor, technical traits and production systems. It’s a story brimming with fascinating anecdotes on gin’s origins and evolution, political and economic influences, and episodes involving famous figures. And it is this “behind the scenes” knowledge that renders every sip of gin so special, realizations that help us better appreciate the rebirth of mixology and the revived interest in gin. Today you hold the definitive gin guide in your hands.

The Spirit of Rye: Over 300 Expressions to Celebrate the Rye Revival by Carlo DeVito Cider Mill Press (November 2, 2021) Celebrate the many flavor profiles of rye whiskey, its distinguished history, and its contemporary revival with The Spirit of Rye. The resurgence in rye whiskey is unmistakable, as is evidenced in the number of distillers producing remarkably varied expressions, from the Whiskey Trail to Pennsylvania, Texas, and California. With tasting notes for over 300 expressions and interviews with master distillers, readers both familiar and new to the rich world of rye will find The Spirit of Rye to be a revelation.

Can I Mix You a Drink? by T-PAIN & Maxwell Britten Kingston Imperial (November 2, 2021) In 2007, “rappa ternt sanga” T-Pain released his hit single “Can I Buy U A Drank (Shawty Snappin’),” propelling the artist to mainstream royalty. Since then, the Tallahassee, Florida native has secured his position as one of the most successful and diverse hip-hop artists in the world. It all started, really, with a song about liquor. T-Pain’s extensive career has been punctuated by libations. It’s been a part of his music, his business acumen (having secured a number of ambassador deals with liquor brands like Jose Cuervo), and his overall persona. Now, T-Pain brings his love of mixology and music in book form, titled Can I Mix You A Drink? Working with Mixologist Maxwell Britten, former Bar Director to Brooklyn’s James Beard Award Winning Maison Premiere, T-Pain sets cocktails to music. Each drink has been carefully curated to reflect a sentiment from one of his hit songs. Drink by drink, T-Pain explores levels of new flavors (and potencies) to create a work that can be used for parties, local bars, pre-gaming before the club, or even just a quiet night at home. It’s nearly impossible not to hear T-Pain’s music as you read through the drinks and their unique combinations and names. Considering T-Pain is known for unorthodox mixes in his music, expect the same from his drinks, along with some classic cocktails modified by T-Pain himself. Whether you’re a fan of T-Pain or a fan of drink-making, Can I Mix You A Drink? is the cocktail book for you.

Death & Co Welcome Home: A Cocktail Recipe Book by Alex Day, Nick Fauchald & David Kaplan Ten Speed Press (November 2, 2021) In this stunning new offering from the authors of the bestselling Death & Co and James Beard Book of the Year Cocktail Codex, you’ll find everything you need to make and serve impressive drinks at home. It begins with a boot camp of sorts, where you follow the same steps a new Death & Co bartender would, learning how to select ingredients, develop your palate, understand what makes a great cocktail work, mix drinks accurately, create a cocktail menu, and much more. More than 400 recipes anchor the book, including classics, low-ABV drinks, non-alcoholic cocktails, and hundreds of the signature creations the Death & Co teams in New York, Denver, and Los Angeles have developed over the past seven years, including the Telegraph and Buko Gimlet. The Cocktails at Home section teaches you how to scale up recipes for larger gatherings, fill your freezer with ready-to-pour mixtures, and throw a party where you can actually spend more time with your guests than prepping drinks.And when you’re ready to create your own recipes, the Death & Co crew pulls back the curtain on their cocktail development program, with plenty of strategies and the opportunity to mix and taste along with the staff. Featuring hundreds of photographs and illustrations, this comprehensive, visually arresting manual is destined to break new ground in home bars across the world.

The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails by David Wondrich & Noah Rothbaum Oxford University Press (November 4, 2021) Anthropologists and historians have confirmed the central role alcohol has played in nearly every society since the dawn of human civilization, but it is only recently that it has been the subject of serious scholarly inquiry. The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails is the first major reference work to cover the subject from a global perspective, and provides an authoritative, enlightening, and entertaining overview of this third branch of the alcohol family. It will stand alongside the bestselling Companions to Wine and Beer, presenting an in-depth exploration of the world of spirits and cocktails in a groundbreaking synthesis. The Companion covers drinks, processes, and techniques from around the world as well as those in the US and Europe. It provides clear explanations of the different ways that spirits are produced, including fermentation, distillation, and ageing, alongside a wealth of new detail on the emergence of
cocktails and cocktail bars, including entries on key cocktails and influential mixologists and cocktail bars. With entries ranging from Manhattan and mixology to sloe gin and stills, the Companion combines coverage of the range of spirit-based drinks around the world with clear explanations of
production processes, and the history and culture of their consumption. It is the ultimate guide to understanding what is in your glass.

San Francisco Cocktails: An Elegant Collection of Over 100 Recipes Inspired by the City by the Bay by Trevor Felch Cider Mill Press (November 16, 2021) Mix up a taste of the City by the Bay with San Francisco Cocktails. Featuring recipes from and profiles on some of the most recognizable bars in San Francisco, this is the definitive guide to drinking in San Fran. With easy-to-follow recipes sure to be a crowd pleaser and inspiring interviews with local bartenders, this is the perfect gift for cocktail lovers everywhere. Gorgeous, full-color photography gives you a taste of each cocktail long before you mix them up yourself. No matter where you find yourself, San Francisco Cocktails will transport you to the heart of the city in seconds flat.

GSN Review: Eastside Distilling Oregon Marionberry Whiskey

In celebration of the berry that is exclusively grown in the Pacific Northwest, Portland’s Eastside Distilling is once again bottling its Oregon Marionberry Whiskey, set to be released today. Crafted using Oregon marionberries and bourbon whiskey from distilleries across the country that have rested in select Oregon oak casks, this is Eastside’s newest product. This spring, they launched three handcrafted whiskeys (Rye, Bourbon, Single Malt) and three other small batch products (Rum, Gin, Brandy).

The famed Oregon marionberry, a cross between Chehalem and Olallie blackberries, was bred at Oregon State University as part of a berry-developing partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the 1950s. Named for Marion County in the Willamette Valley, where the field tests took place and where many marionberries are still grown today, it has often been described as the “king of the blackberries” because of its complex, rich, and earthy flavor that is sweet-yet-tart.

Eastside’s Head Distiller, Jason Ericson describes it as “The Cabernet of Blackberries meets Bourbon Whiskey. I believe marionberry whiskey is where wine drinkers and whiskey drinkers meet,” he continues. “Many of the flavors and aromas of berry and oak will be immediately recognizable to oenophiles. The intense berry flavor mixed with notes of citrus, vanilla, and oak are the perfect introduction to the wide world of whiskey.”

GSN’s Remarks: Ericson sums it up well. This is a marriage between wine-like flavors and whiskey flavors. The fruit has a solid and definitive tang that still adds sweetness, while the spirit carries the oakiness and warmth. Really, the result is very much like a cocktail in many ways. Tasty as a neat pour, it also holds up well over ice. You might even be tempted to add a little to your breakfast table. Eastside has a real winner on their hands, and if you can snag a bottle or two before it disappears, consider yourself lucky. GSN Rating: A

For more information go to: Eastside Distilling

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