GSN Review: Garryana 2018, Edition 3|1 Whiskey

In its quest to express the unique terroir of Westland’s Pacific Northwest origins, Westland Distillery’s ambitious Garryana series relies on the limited supply of the very rare Quercus garryana, a species of white oak that imparts a distinctive flavor profile to single malt whiskey. With the September release of Garryana 2018, Edition 3|1, Westland reveals how supply fluctuations can challenge the distilling team to evolve the series in new directions.

Unlike the previous two editions, which married ratios of full-term matured Garry oak casks to traditional oak casks, the limited supply of Garry oak forced Master Distiller Matt Hofmann and Blender Shane Armstrong to employ a series of vattings and casks finishes for this year’s edition. The resulting whiskey features component whiskies that are each matured in a combination of casks, producing a complex integrated flavor profile. With a mash bill of 5-malt, Washington Select and heavily peated, the whiskey was aged in Garry oak, New American oak, 1st fill ex-bourbon, 1st fill ex-Port and refill ex-Westland casks.

“Each year, we must begin with assessing what is available to us, and then be open to following a path that the cask and the whiskies reveal,” explains Hofmann. “Because we cannot rely on a formula, we must be inventive in the ways we work with the supply in order to end up with a whiskey we are proud of.”

Garryana 2018, Edition 3|1 (112 proof)
Visual: Copper.
Nose: Loads of toffee, and surprisingly, a banana-like ester that gives this a tropical nose. Quite unique.
Taste: Less peated than I expected, which isn’t a bad thing at all. It allows the malt to shine with a hearty and semi-spicy chew. The flavor is round and full, with a tannic sizzle on the far back palate.  Aggressive and wood-forward.
Finish: Long with some darker, molasses and toffee notes finishing the journey. Curiously, there is also a cigar-like tobacco taste that lingers for quite a while.
Overall: Definitely a lot going on here. Unlike any whiskey on the market ever.  Worth checking out if you can manage to procure a bottle.  This one won’t last long with collectors scooping it up.
GSN Rating: A-

For more information go to: Westland Distillery

GSN Review: Glenfiddich Fire & Cane

Recently, Glenfiddich launched the fourth concept in its Experimental Series with Glenfiddich Fire & Cane, a peated whisky finished in rum casks.

Fire & Cane is inspired by the early innovation of Glenfiddich Malt Master Brian Kinsman, who ran peated spirit through the Glenfiddich stills for the first time in 2003, birthing the concept. Fire & Cane marries smoky whisky with non-peated whisky that had been maturing side-by-side in bourbon casks, highlighting Glenfiddich’s sweet and fruity signature style. Then, taking it a step further, Kinsman finished the married whisky in Latin rum casks, sourced from various South American countries, for three months to produce a surprising and unexpected overlay of flavors with added caramel toffee sweetness.

“This new single malt truly encapsulates the spirit of experimentation. We started with a question – what would happen if we did something with peat that we had not done before? The answer is an unconventional and unexpected whisky, one that is truly surprising,” said Glenfiddich Malt Master Brian Kinsman. “It’s a bold combination, which I’m sure will appeal and intrigue single malt enthusiasts as well as those looking to try something new and different.”

Glenfiddich Experimental Series combines the brand’s passion for pushing Scotch whisky boundaries while unlocking new possibilities in the true spirit of experimentation. Past releases in the series include the Glenfiddich India Pale Ale Cask Finish, Glenfiddich Project XX and Glenfiddich Winter Storm.

Glenfiddich Fire & Cane (86 proof)
Visual: Gold.
Nose: Medium smoke and light malt fruitiness. Dry, crisp and autumnal.
Taste: Nicely sweet, with a semi-honeyed entry. A raisin-like fruit character goes on at length turning into prune and baking spice. The smoke keeps everything from going off in too much of a fruity direction.
Finish: Long with a light patina of smoke and dried fruit.
Overall: A successful experiment!  The rum casks impart a novel edge to the Glenfiddich standard.  We especially enjoyed this served neat on a cool evening.
GSN Rating: A

For more information go to: Glenfiddich

GSN Alert: September 20th – National Rum Punch Day

A_Midnight_Modern_ConversationBack in my college days, I thought that punch equalled a 1.5l bottle of Silver Bacardi mixed together with a few cans of tropical flavored Hawaiian Punch.  After a few different occasions where this was the beverage of choice, I had enough to last me a lifetime and moved on to other less cloying things like IPA.  In fact, I hadn’t had any punch for a few decades until I read David Wondrich’s phenomenal book Imbibe! back in 2007.  I decided to make a batch of Philadelphia Fish House Punch for my first effort, and there’s been no turning back for me.  Granted, there is a bit of extra work involved than just emptying bottles into a large bowl (oleo-saccharum, anyone?), but it pays off in spades.  Not only is a real punch incredibly tasty, but you realize why punches are gaining popularity again.  These days, many of the best bars offer punch bowls on the menu, and some are even served with antique cups.

Here’s the recipe for PFHP (luckily, it doesn’t actually call for any fish).

Philadelphia Fish House Punch
(Servings: 18 – 20)
1 cup sugar
4 lemons, peeled and peels reserved
4 cups black tea (or water)
1 cup lemon juice
4 cups rum, Jamaican
2 cups cognac
1/2 cup peach brandy
Garnish: lemon wheels and freshly grated nutmeg

In a large bowl, add sugar and lemon peels, and rub together to release the citrus oils into the sugar. (This is called oleo-saccharum).
Allow oleo-saccharum to infuse for at least 30 minutes.
Dissolve sugar with warm water or tea.
Add rum, cognac, lemon juice and peach brandy and stir to mix.
Add a block of ice to chill, and continue to add smaller pieces of ice for desired dilution.
Garnish with lemon wheels and freshly grated nutmeg.
Ladle into individual glasses.

Another quite popular punch is Planter’s Punch, the recipe for which was first published as a poem in the New York Times on August 8, 1908.

Planter’s Punch
This recipe I give to thee,
Dear brother in the heat.
Take two of sour (lime let it be)
To one and a half of sweet,
Of Old Jamaica pour three strong,
And add four parts of weak.
Then mix and drink. I do no wrong —
I know whereof I speak.

Pretty easy to figure out what the measurements are, if you’re handy with a jigger.

Cheers!

GSN Presents: How Well Do You Know Your Whiskey?

Whiskey is a universal spirit, enjoyed by everyone—from the Irish to the Japanese and back around to the United States. Even fictional characters love whiskey (think Don Draper and Ron Burgundy). But just how much do you know about this iconic spirit of the world? It’s quite common (even among connoisseurs) to misjudge a whiskey. So, just what is the difference between a whiskey and a scotch? Where is bourbon made? And is it spelled whiskey or whisky?

Whiskey & Geography

To call a whiskey a whiskey is not enough in itself to determine exactly what you’re drinking. Whiskey is simply a category that encompasses all the different types of whiskies. The biggest telltale sign is geography.

Let’s first examine Scotch whisky (or simply, scotch). Scotch is a type of whiskey that is only distilled in Scotland. Note the omission of the “e” when we refer to Scotch as Scotch whisky. This is not a typo but rather a cultural difference in the etymology of the word. Scots (along with Canadians and Japanese) spell whisky without the “e”.

Bourbon is the fastest growing spirit in the US—probably because it’s made right here in the states. Bourbon is a type of American whiskey that is distilled only in the US, and more specifically, in Kentucky. However, there’s a common misconception about bourbon that we need to clear up.  Most people think that all bourbon is made in Kentucky. While a large percentage of bourbon (nearly 95%) is distilled in Kentucky, there are other states that distill bourbon (and the quality is on par with anything Kentucky-made).

There’s another type of American whiskey that we need to discuss—Tennessee whiskey. Tennessee whiskey, on the contrary, must be made and aged in the Volunteer State. Tennessee whiskey and bourbon are actually very similar whiskies: both have a composition of at least 51% corn and both are aged in new white oak barrels. The slight difference between the two is that Tennessee whiskey is maple charcoal filtered before being filled into casks for aging.

Rye is another type of whiskey. Its main ingredient can be guessed by its namesake. This style can be made either in the US or Canada.

Of course, Irish whiskey is whiskey that hails from Ireland.

Whiskey & Its Ingredients

Another defining attribute of a whiskey are the ingredients (or the mash bill). There are several laws (specifically here in the US) that govern what certain styles of whiskey must be made from. To simplify things, remember the rule of 51. Bourbon and Tennessee whiskey must contain at least 51% corn. Rye whiskey must contain at least 51% rye.

A few Scottish whiskies (don’t forget to drop the “e” when it’s distilled in Scotland) also have restrictions on the ingredients they can be made with. A malt whisky is made only from malted barley while a blended whisky contains a mixture of different grains (barley, wheat).

Where To Get Started

It’s a lot of information to take in, as any whiskey connoisseur can attest to. However, trying each different type of whiskey and reflecting on each individual nuance can give you a greater appreciation for this popular spirit. And we have a few suggestions (courtesy of GSN) to get you started: try this single malt whiskey from Stranahan’s, a bourbon from Gentleman Jack, or a rye whiskey from Knob Creek. They are all excellent, and each has its own pleasures.  As Mark Twain said, “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.”

Article by Devin Mills – Distilling Craft

GSN Review: Little City Vermouth

Little City Vermouth is a new product in a category which is just begging for more variety. After all, three of the most iconic cocktails in the world call for it (Martini, Manhattan & Negroni). I asked Will Clark, the owner of New York State’s Little City how he became interested in crafting vermouth.
“First I got into cocktails. I began collecting bottles and inventing drinks. In an effort to create cocktails with more unique character I began making my own ingredients—syrups, shrubs, infusions. I had been exploring vermouth, sipping it on its own and relying on it heavily in many of my drinks. From a mixologist perspective, I was intrigued by vermouth. In a way, it’s like a pre-made cocktail, a combination of herbs, liquor and sugar. And it’s a diverse category with much room for experimentation and personal expression. I began making my own vermouth in my Harlem apartment. I played with different methods of extraction, different blending processes. I researched the history of vermouth—which is as old as wine itself—and tried to track down every botanical that had ever been used in vermouth. The possible flavor combinations are endless. Eventually, I was making vermouth that I preferred to anything I could buy in the store. I would drink it on it’s own and put it in almost every cocktail. I shared it with a few bartender and restaurant owner friends of mine and got positive responses. They said that if I could sell it to them legally, they would buy it. That “legally” part is more easily said than done.”
Will continued, “I searched throughout New York State to find a producer that would work with me to make this vermouth just how I wanted it made. Because vermouth is a blend of wine and spirit, and because vermouth is considered wine by the federal government and spirit by the New York state government, licensing is a bit tricky. Of the distilleries and wineries that I spoke with, Finger Lakes Distilling was the most willing to take on the challenges of production and compliance on my terms. They are experts at what they do, and they were excited to lend their vast knowledge to my project without forcing me to change my recipe. They liked what I already had, and they wanted to help me bring it to market. Now it’s here.”
I asked Will what kind of wine is used in his sweet & dry vermouths. “Both Little City Vermouths are built on a base of Cayuga White wine. Cayuga White is a cross of Schuyler and Seyval Blanc grapes that was developed at Cornell University in an effort to create a grape that would grow well in the Finger Lakes region of New York State. And it does grow well there. And that’s where we get it. Specifically, it comes from Glenora Wine Cellars, just across Seneca Lake from Finger Lakes Distilling.”
GSN’s Thoughts
Little City Dry (17.5% abv) With 38 botanicals, this vermouth is very citrus forward on the entry, with a lime character. A bit tart and zippy. The wine character comes through after this, followed by a softer and mellow herb flavor. There is a slight bitterness to the whole affair, which is how it should be. Overall, quite well-balanced and fruity. GSN Rating: B+
Little City Sweet (16.5% abv) Using 53 botanicals, the sweet has a smokey, almost tea like flavor at first, lightened with a burnt sugar character. The herbs are complex with a floral, spicy and semi-bitter edge. The wine serves more as a delivery system here than showing up with any real presence, but it works well as a canvas to the blend of botanicals. Very nice and well-rounded. GSN Rating: A- 

For more information go to: Little City Vermouth

GSN Alert: Cocktail & Spirits Book Preview – Autumn 2018 (October-December)

Summer is almost over, so now it’s time for our quarterly GSN Cocktail & Spirits Guide Roundup. Cheers!

The Martini Field Guide: Martini Culture for the Cocktail Renaissance by Shane Carley Cider Mill Press (October 2, 2018) The Martini Field Guide is as potent as the gin used to make the iconic drink. Both cocktail connoisseurs and Happy Hour newbies will lose themselves in this heavily illustrated book, featuring vintage ads and imagery from some of the world’s top distillers, as they read about the Martini’s muddled origins and how an American concoction became popular worldwide. Whether you prefer it shaken or stirred, dry or dirty, The Martini Field Guide provides plenty of ways to think about, make, and drink this popular cocktail, making for the perfect addition to any cocktail lover’s collection.

Experimental Cocktail Club: London. Paris. New York. Ibiza by Experimental Cocktail Club Mitchell Beazley (October 2, 2018) Over 85 recipes for extraordinary cocktails from the award-winning, internationally renowned Experimental Cocktail Club. Treat your taste buds to this collection of very special cocktail recipes that take inspiration from classic American and French cocktails – served with the unmistakable Experimental Cocktail Club flair and style. Recipes include Stockholm Syndrome (Ketel 1 vodka infused with cumin & dill, Linie aquavit, lemon juice, simple syrup, pink Himalayan salt and Peychauds bitters) and Tete de Mule (or ‘Kind of Stubborn’, a salty cocktail containing Don Fulano Blanco, orange juice, tomato juice, agave syrup and topped with ginger beer) – as well as their take on classic cocktails such as Negroni, Margarita, Moscow Mule and Strawberry Daiquiri.

Cocktail Codex: Fundamentals, Formulas, Evolutions by Alex Day, Nick Fauchald & David Kaplan Ten Speed Press (October 30, 2018) From the authors of the best-selling and genre-defining cocktail book Death & CoCocktail Codex is a comprehensive primer on the craft of mixing drinks that employs the authors’ unique “root cocktails” approach to give drink-makers of every level the tools to understand, execute, and improvise both classic and original cocktails. “There are only six cocktails.” So say Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, and David Kaplan, the visionaries behind the seminal craft cocktail bar Death & Co. In Cocktail Codex, these experts reveal for the first time their surprisingly simple approach to mastering cocktails: the “root recipes,” six easily identifiable (and memorizable!) templates that encompass all cocktails: the old-fashioned, martini, daiquiri, sidecar, whisky highball, and flip. Once you understand the hows and whys of each “family,” you’ll understand why some cocktails work and others don’t, when to shake and when to stir, what you can omit and what you can substitute when you’re missing ingredients, why you like the drinks you do, and what sorts of drinks you should turn to–or invent–if you want to try something new.

The Dead Rabbit Mixology & Mayhem by Sean Muldoon, Jack McGarry & Jillian Vose Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (October 30, 2018) A groundbreaking graphic novel-style cocktail book from world-renowned bar The Dead Rabbit in New York City. The Dead Rabbit Grocery & Grog in lower Manhattan has won every cocktail award there is to win, including being named “Best Bar in the World” in 2016. Since their award-winning cocktail book The Dead Rabbit Drinks Manual was published in 2015, founders Sean Muldoon and Jack McGarry, along with bar manager Jillian Vose, have completely revamped the bar’s menus in a bold, graphic novel style, now featured in their newest collection The Dead Rabbit Mixology & Mayhem. Based on “Gangs of New York”-era tales retold with modern personalities from the bar world (including the authors) portrayed as the heroes and villains of the story, the menus are highly sought-after works of art. This stunning new book, featuring 100 cocktail recipes, fleshes out the tall tales even further in a collectible hardcover edition—making it a must-have for the bar’s passionate fans who line up every night of the week.

A Drinkable Feast: A Cocktail Companion to 1920s Paris by Philip Greene TarcherPerigee (October 16, 2018) A history of the Lost Generation in 1920s Paris told through the lens of the cocktails they loved. In the Prohibition era, American cocktail enthusiasts flocked to the one place that would have them–Paris. In this sweeping look at the City of Light, cocktail historian Philip Greene follows the notable American ex-pats who made themselves at home in Parisian cafes and bars, from Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Gertrude Stein to Picasso, Coco Chanel, Cole Porter, and many more. A Drinkable Feast reveals the history of more than 50 cocktails: who was imbibing them, where they were made popular, and how to make them yourself from the original recipes of nearly a century ago. Filled with anecdotes and photos of the major players of the day, you’ll feel as if you were there yourself, walking down the boulevards with the Lost Generation.

The Cocktail Companion: A Guide to Cocktail History, Culture, Trivia and Favorite Drinks by Cheryl Charming Mango (November 15, 2018) Cheryl Charming aka Miss Charming™ has been heavily steeped in the cocktail culture as a bartender since 1980. She has 15 published bar and cocktail related books. In high school she worked as a pizza waitress then quickly progressed to cocktail waitress, bar back, bartender, and head bartender. With a penchant for travel, Cheryl tended bar many places around America, a cruise ship in the Caribbean, and Walt Disney World. While working at WDW she became the bar trick/bar magic instructor for Disney’s F&B training program, Quest for the Best. Cheryl was also involved with hosting and participating in events for Tales of the Cocktail and teaching “Edutaining” cocktail classes for Royal Caribbean Cruise Line passengers. She is a member of The Bartenders Guild and The Museum of the American Cocktail. Cheryl studied Graphic and Interactive Communication at Ringling College of Art & Design and works as a freelance graphic artist on the side. Currently, she lives in the French Quarter and is the bar director at Bourbon O Bar on the corner of Bourbon and Orleans inside the Bourbon Orleans Hotel in the French Quarter. She was named “Mixologist of the Year” on 2014 by New Orleans Magazine.

Spirit of the North: COCKTAIL RECIPES AND STORIES FROM SCANDINAVIA by Selma Slabiak teNeues Publishing Company (November 15, 2018) What could possibly be better than sharing and enjoying in life’s simpler pleasures with friends and loved ones? This idea is at the heart of the Scandinavian lifestyle trends that many in contemporary culture have come to embrace. In an ever-present, all-encompassing quest to create this “just right” feeling when entertaining guests, star mixologist Selma Slabiak celebrates her Danish heritage by combining her personal and professional ethos for conviviality and togetherness with her expert, innovative knowledge of foraging and farm-to-table practice to present inventive drink and cocktail recipes in one multi-faceted book. Slabiak shares with her readers elevated bartending expertise and finesse, layering familiar and unusual flavors and ingredients, along with Scandinavian traditions and nostalgic stories from her childhood in Denmark, in an inspiring, delicious, and original recipe book of Nordic-based cocktails—so we can all capture the extraordinary in the everyday.

Ciderology: From History and Heritage to the Craft Cider Revolution by Gabe Cook Spruce (October 2, 2018) In Ciderology, Gabe Cook, aka ‘The Ciderologist,’ leading global cider expert, shares his passion for all things cider (and perry!), with an essential history of the drink and production processes, and a round-the-world tour of the most important and exciting cider makers in operation. You’ll find delicious recipes incorporating cider, tasting notes for cider styles that you can try yourself, and a wealth of anecdotes and tales that intermingle fact and myth. A real treat for the drinks enthusiast, inveterate cider lover and cider novice alike, Ciderology contains anything and everything you have ever needed to know about cider.

The Home Bar: A Guide to Designing, Equipping & Stocking Your Own Bar by Henry Jeffreys Gibbs Smith (October 9, 2018) Whether you desire a small, selectively stocked bar cart or are planning a bespoke entertaining space in your home, this book is a beautiful and indispensable guide to enjoying drinks at home, anytime. The Home Bar traces the cultural history of social drinking and bar design, and how this translates into highly desirable and stylish bars in a home setting. You will find advice on everything from the best bar surface to how to make and store ice, from cocktail shakers to stools, from stirrers to selecting the best glassware. For the discerning drinker fascinated by the mystique of soda siphons, cocktail kits, and seriously interesting aperitifs and digestives, there are tips on how to build up an enviable drinks collection. With a comprehensive selection of more than thirty superlative cocktail recipes, this is a fascinating and informative aid to stocking and enjoying your own home bar.

Whiskey America by Dominic Roskrow Mitchell Beazley (October 2, 2018) What can we expect from the best whiskey producers in America today? Whiskey America showcases some of the most exciting new styles of whiskey and why they are so special. Offering fascinating interviews with some of the leading characters in the recent distilling revolution, this absorbing book relates the stories of how successful lawyers, doctors and city slickers made the life-changing decision to turn their backs on conventional careers to pursue the ‘good life’ of making spirits in the most far-flung outreaches of America. And thank goodness they did, because this new generation of distillers not only customized conventional whiskey styles but also invented new ones never seen before. Whiskey America investigates how best to enjoy the new whiskies – in cocktails, with food, mixed or straight – and looks forward to where these exciting American spirits are going next.

Ten Drinks That Changed the World by Seki Lynch & Tom Maryniak Acc Art Books (November 5, 2018) Walk into any bar, in almost any part of the world, and there, on the back shelf you’re likely to see Vodka, Gin, Scotch, Bourbon, Brandy, Rum, Shochu, Tequila, Absinthe, Vermouth. These drinks helped shape our culture; inspired authors and painters, brought both anarchy and harmony and even, in some cases, induced mass hysteria. In 10 Drinks That Changed the World, bartender, poet and writer Seki Lynch tells the stories behind the spirits. Tracing the origins of each drink, he dissects the ingredients and locates the first makers, exploring how perceptions and consumption levels have ebbed and flowed through the centuries. Cocktail recipes, lists of artisan makers and insights from the great, good and notorious drinkers of history help complete the résumé for each drink. London artist Tom Maryniak has created original illustrations of each drink for the book.

Eat, Drink and Be Sherry: The Stylish Renaissance of a Great Wine by Ben Howkins & Hugh Johnson Quiller Publishing (November 1, 2018) Eat Drink and Be Sherry highlights the world’s most underrated fine wine. With over 50 years of experience in the wine industry, Ben Howkins looks outside the box to bring to life this increasingly popular drink. Howkins includes history, geography, and the production process to help position the sherry category in a wider context, with contributions from 50 of the leading sherry influencers. Sherry is a magnificent multi-faceted wine now very much on the “up” as a popular drink and this fascinating and accessible history will be of great interest to all who love good food and wine.

Apéritif: Cocktail Hour the French Way by Rebekah Peppler Clarkson Potter (October 16, 2018) For the French, the fleeting interlude between a long workday and the evening meal to come is not meant to be hectic or crazed. Instead, that time is a much-needed chance to pause, take a breath, and reset with light drinks and snacks. Whether it’s a quick affair before dashing out the door to your favorite Parisian bistro or a lead-up to a more lavish party, Apéritif is about kicking off the night, rousing the appetite, and doing so with the carefree spirit of connection and conviviality. Apéritif celebrates that easygoing lifestyle with simple yet stylish recipes for both classic and modern French apéritif-style cocktails, along with French-inspired bites and hors d’oeuvres. Keeping true to the apéritif tradition, you’ll find cocktail recipes that use lighter, low-alcohol spirits, fortified wines, and bitter liqueurs. The impressive drinks have influences from both Old World and New, but are always low fuss and served barely embellished–an easy feat to pull off for the relaxed host at home. Apéritif also offers recipes for equally breezy bites, such as Radishes with Poppy Butter, Gougères, Ratatouille Dip, and Buckwheat-Sel Gris Crackers. For evenings that are all about ease and approachability without sacrificing style or flavor, Apéritif makes drinking and entertaining at home as effortless, fun, and effervescent as the offerings themselves.

GSN Alert: September 15th – National Crème de Menthe Day

Qtimthumb.phpuick!  How many classic crème de menthe based cocktails can you name? Go!

That’s what I thought.  Highlight the area to the right to see if you got them all -> Grasshopper, Stinger

Crème de menthe is one of those liqueurs that once you try, you will never forget.  For obvious reasons it is used in a fair amount of obscure Irish cocktails, but personally I avoid those.

Crème de menthe is not a cream based liqueur, but rather a category of spirits known as crèmes, which are more syrupy and sugar laden than standard liquors.  It is made from Corsican mint or peppermint and is either colorless (white) or vibrantly green.  Most products today use food coloring to achieve the effect.  The flavors are exactly the same however.

If you want to try making your own at home, here’s a recipe courtesy of Marcia Simmons, co-author of DIY Cocktails which I have previously reviewed here.

DIY Creme de Menthe
1 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves (divided)
1 1/2 cups vodka
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup water

  • Measure out 1 cup of mint leaves and tear them in quarters Place mint leaves in a sealable glass jar and pour vodka on top. Shake and let steep for 12 hours.
  • After steeping is complete, strain mint leaves from infused vodka. Return infused vodka to the jar.
  • Bring the water and sugar to a boil, and let simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool, then add syrup to mint-infused vodka.
  • Take the additional 1/2 cup of mint leaves, tear them, and add them to the jar. Shake and let steep for 10 hours.
  • Strain twice to remove all mint leaves, keep in resealable bottle. Keeps for two months.